SCOTUS Narrowly Sides with Baker

As difficult as this is, we must take the high road and not act hostilely either directly or indirectly, as with the Colorado Civil Rights Commission. Otherwise, things will go against us for the most ridiculous reasons, like in this case.

The Supreme Court sided with a baker who has religious objections to same-sex couples’ weddings in a narrow decision on Monday morning.

The long-awaited decision in the Masterpiece Cakeshop case, however, mostly avoided the hot-button question of whether civil rights laws could force that baker, Jack Phillips, to make a wedding cake for such couples.

Instead, Justice Anthony Kennedy’s decision for the court focused on the fact that Phillips was treated with “hostility” by Colorado’s Civil Rights Commission — action that the Supreme Court ruled violates the First Amendment’s Free Exercise Clause.

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Federal Court Rules Employers Can’t Fire People for Being Gay

Well if SCOTUS is too scared to address the issue, I’m glad that the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals is willing to address it.

In a groundbreaking, 8-3 decision, the full Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation violates federal civil rights law.

The court found that such discrimination is a form of sex discrimination in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the federal law prohibiting employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, and religion.

The decision — which came in Lambda Legal’s case on behalf of Kimberly Hively, an instructor at Ivy Tech Community College who was fired for being a lesbian — makes the Seventh Circuit the highest federal court to reach this conclusion and could change the national landscape of employment law for LGBT people.

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Dozens of Big Businesses Back Gavin Grimm

First, please allow me to apologize for not posting more as of late. I know a lot is going on with the new regime in position, but at times it is overwhelming to me and I tend to want to just shut down mentally.

Second, this story has brought to life a legal term I’ve heard before, but don’t know much about: amicus brief. This is the definition of an amicus brief, for anyone unfamiliar with the term as I was:

An amicus brief is a document that is filed in a court by someone who is not directly related to the case under consideration. The most classic example is a document filed by an advocacy group, such as the American Civil Liberties Union. The additional information found in such a document can be useful for the judge evaluating the case, and it becomes part of the official case record. Many nations allow people or entities to file such documents with their courts.

The tradition of accepting amicus briefs comes from a larger concept, the amicus curiae, or “friend of the court.” A friend of the court may be interested in a case for various reasons, although he or she is not directly involved. For example, a court might be preparing to try a case related to online file sharing, an issue of great concern to many people. A brief might be filed to discuss the larger ramifications of potential case outcomes, since these ramifications might not be brought up by the prosecution or defense during the course of a trial.

I think it’s remarkable that 53 major companies have put their name to a single brief involving one young man’s struggle, but with huge impact on all who struggle as he does.

Dozens of companies have signed up to back a transgender teenager who is taking his case to use the bathroom matching his gender identity to the Supreme Court.

A coalition of 53 companies on Thursday wrote an amicus brief to the Supreme Court supporting the Virginia student.

I think, however, that this brief will be directed toward the lower courts as I heard yesterday that the Supreme Court declined to hear argument so the case reverts to the lower courts.

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Source of definition

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Stories Behind Transgender Laws

The struggle for rights is ever-present no matter if you’re L, G, B or T. I think the struggle for transgender individuals is harder, in some respects, because their issues are more complicated. People just aren’t ready or willing to accept that others may have been born the wrong sex; that their god or Mother Nature can screw up sometimes. Hell, as we’ve seen this election cycle, there’s a lot of hate that exists beyond the LGBT community.

As soon as Friday, the justices of the Supreme Court could decide if they will hear the appeal in a critical case about whether Gavin Grimm, a transgender male student, can be barred in his Virginia school district from using the boys’ restroom.

The justices first considered whether to take the case on Oct. 14, but took no action, leaving LGBT advocates — and Grimm — in waiting.

The case in question concerns Gloucester County School Board, an Education Department policy, and the widely covered issue of transgender people and bathrooms. But the underlying question of whether existing law — specifically, sex-discrimination bans — protects against gender identity-based discrimination has been moving forward in the courts and administrative agencies for years now.

As the election season clock ticks down to election day, the legal fight over transgender protections is reaching a crescendo. During the Obama administration, officials have undertaken a revolutionary application of those existing laws to affirm the rights of transgender individuals, spurring a rapid shift within the federal government as the culture, too, changes. Meanwhile, as the petition pends before the Supreme Court, there were three federal district court actions on transgender rights this past week alone — one of which led the Justice Department on Thursday afternoon to announce that it will be taking the matter to a federal appeals court.

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Ky County Clerk Names Could Be Removed From Marriage Licenses

Who cares if he has the authority? Let him make the change so that idiot woman and all of her worshippers can feel better about themselves. Anything to shut the bitch up – and anyone else like her.

Just weeks after winning his election, Kentucky Republican Gov. Matt Bevin fulfilled a campaign promise on Tuesday to accommodate county clerks who hold a religious objection to same-sex couples marrying — a cause elevated to national attention by Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis.

But critics said Bevin has overstepped his authority as governor.

At the heart of the dispute is Davis, who was sued in federal court for refusing to issue marriage licenses after the Supreme Court’s ruling for marriage equality. Davis contended that issuing licenses to same-sex couples violated her religious freedom, because Kentucky state law mandates that the name of elected county clerks appear on the licenses — which Davis argued was a form of endorsement of those marriages.

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Davis Won’t Go Away

I think at this point, she’s just clinging to the fame. There are many stories around the web right now about this woman who won’t go away. I’ll share links here:

In Rural Kentucky, Residents Disagree About County Clerk Kim Davis

Kentucky Clerk Files Brief Arguing She Should Not Be Held In Contempt Of Court

Kentucky Clerk Kim Davis Anticipated The Same-Sex Marriage Ruling — And Planned Accordingly

Meet Kim Davis, The Woman Denying Same-Sex Couples Marriage Licenses In Kentucky

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A Transgender Man Was Married By The Kentucky Clerk Who Refuses To Perform Same-Sex Marriage

I understand what this couple is trying to do, but this ignorant woman should no longer work for any government in any capacity – even the lowliest of jobs – still refuses to issue licenses to ALL couples, gay OR straight and yet this one slipped by and she allowed it. Someone in Kentucky needs to start a petitiion to remove her from office. She’s never going to budge so We the People need to budge her right out of office.

The Kentucky county clerk who has petitioned the Supreme Court to be exempted from performing same-sex marriages due to her religious beliefs signed a marriage certificate for a transgender man and his pansexual wife earlier this year.

Rowan County Clerk Kimberly Davis ordered her staff to stop issuing any marriage licenses in the wake of June’s historic Supreme Court decision in favor of nationwide marriage equality because she objects to having her name appear on the documents for religious reasons.

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Georgia Pastor Has No Time For Anti-LGBT Hypocrites

It’s always uplifting to see that not all pastors preach hate.

Religious people who are critical of the LGBT community and the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage are “hypocritical,” Georgia pastor E. Dewey Smith said in a videotaped sermon that was posted Thursday.

Smith, who is pastor of the House of Hope Atlanta in Decatur, Georgia, and the House of Hope Macon, chastised his congregation and others who “demonize and dehumanize” artists and even members of their own choir who are gay while enjoying and benefitting from their work.

“We have done what the slave master did to us,” he said. “Dehumanize us, degrade us, demonize us, but then use them for our advantage.”

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KY Clerk Says She ‘Prayed And Fasted’ Before Deciding To Stop Issuing Marriage Licenses

I’d say it’s about time for Miss Davis to retire if she’s unable to follow the law – for any reason. Why should these couples be inconvenienced by her religion? If she resigns and leaves it to her deputies as she said, why is there an assumption that they would have just as big an issue with it as she does?

A Kentucky county clerk says she “prayed and fasted” before ultimately deciding to stop issuing marriage licenses altogether in the wake of the Supreme Court’s legalization of same-sex marriage.

Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis is facing a federal class action lawsuit brought against her by two gay couples and two straight couples after she refused to issue them marriage licenses, The Louisville Courier-Journal reports. Davis, who is reportedly a Apostolic Christian and attends church three times a week, testified July 20 in a Covington, Kentucky courtroom that she “sought God” as she contemplated her options for months ahead of the Supreme Court’s June 26 ruling on marriage equality.

“It was something I had prayed and fasted over,” she said, according to The Lexington Herald-Leader. “It wasn’t a spur of the moment decision.” Issuing licenses under her name, she added, would violate her religious beliefs, even if a deputy clerk were to do so in her stead. “If I say they are authorized, I’m saying I agree with it, and I can’t.”

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Kansas governor’s order shields clergy on same-sex marriage

*sigh* The hate just builds.

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas’ governor told state government agencies Tuesday that they can’t punish ministers or religious groups for opposing same-sex marriage, and critics said he is sanctioning discrimination even as the state extends new benefits to gay and lesbian couples.

Gov. Sam Brownback issued an executive order in response to last month’s U.S. Supreme Court ruling legalizing same-sex marriage across the nation. Brownback’s order said the “imposition” of gay marriage could lead to “potential infringements” of religious liberties.

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