AK Transgender Bathroom Bill Defeated

I’m thankful to the people of Alaska for doing the right thing and defeating such heinous laws. I am waiting for the day some asshole decides to question whether I was born a female. I will sue them for sexual harassment and anything else my lawyer can dream up. Guaranteed. I mean how do you know what gender anyone was born unless you follow them into the bathroom and look at their sex organs?

Voters in Anchorage, Alaska, have narrowly defeated a bill that would have stopped transgender people from using the bathrooms and changing rooms that correspond with their gender identity.

Nearly 53 percent of voters cast their ballots against Proposition 1, which was proposed by nonprofit Christian policy group Alaska Family Action.

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Dozens of Big Businesses Back Gavin Grimm

First, please allow me to apologize for not posting more as of late. I know a lot is going on with the new regime in position, but at times it is overwhelming to me and I tend to want to just shut down mentally.

Second, this story has brought to life a legal term I’ve heard before, but don’t know much about: amicus brief. This is the definition of an amicus brief, for anyone unfamiliar with the term as I was:

An amicus brief is a document that is filed in a court by someone who is not directly related to the case under consideration. The most classic example is a document filed by an advocacy group, such as the American Civil Liberties Union. The additional information found in such a document can be useful for the judge evaluating the case, and it becomes part of the official case record. Many nations allow people or entities to file such documents with their courts.

The tradition of accepting amicus briefs comes from a larger concept, the amicus curiae, or “friend of the court.” A friend of the court may be interested in a case for various reasons, although he or she is not directly involved. For example, a court might be preparing to try a case related to online file sharing, an issue of great concern to many people. A brief might be filed to discuss the larger ramifications of potential case outcomes, since these ramifications might not be brought up by the prosecution or defense during the course of a trial.

I think it’s remarkable that 53 major companies have put their name to a single brief involving one young man’s struggle, but with huge impact on all who struggle as he does.

Dozens of companies have signed up to back a transgender teenager who is taking his case to use the bathroom matching his gender identity to the Supreme Court.

A coalition of 53 companies on Thursday wrote an amicus brief to the Supreme Court supporting the Virginia student.

I think, however, that this brief will be directed toward the lower courts as I heard yesterday that the Supreme Court declined to hear argument so the case reverts to the lower courts.

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Source of definition

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Stories Behind Transgender Laws

The struggle for rights is ever-present no matter if you’re L, G, B or T. I think the struggle for transgender individuals is harder, in some respects, because their issues are more complicated. People just aren’t ready or willing to accept that others may have been born the wrong sex; that their god or Mother Nature can screw up sometimes. Hell, as we’ve seen this election cycle, there’s a lot of hate that exists beyond the LGBT community.

As soon as Friday, the justices of the Supreme Court could decide if they will hear the appeal in a critical case about whether Gavin Grimm, a transgender male student, can be barred in his Virginia school district from using the boys’ restroom.

The justices first considered whether to take the case on Oct. 14, but took no action, leaving LGBT advocates — and Grimm — in waiting.

The case in question concerns Gloucester County School Board, an Education Department policy, and the widely covered issue of transgender people and bathrooms. But the underlying question of whether existing law — specifically, sex-discrimination bans — protects against gender identity-based discrimination has been moving forward in the courts and administrative agencies for years now.

As the election season clock ticks down to election day, the legal fight over transgender protections is reaching a crescendo. During the Obama administration, officials have undertaken a revolutionary application of those existing laws to affirm the rights of transgender individuals, spurring a rapid shift within the federal government as the culture, too, changes. Meanwhile, as the petition pends before the Supreme Court, there were three federal district court actions on transgender rights this past week alone — one of which led the Justice Department on Thursday afternoon to announce that it will be taking the matter to a federal appeals court.

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Seattle man tests transgender rule by undressing in women’s locker room

One of many jackasses to come. He and thousands others like him don’t get it and they never will. Just being an ass because he can. That’s what I love about this country. All asses are proud to be such.

Seattle Parks and Recreation is facing a first-of-a-kind challenge to gender bathroom rules.

Last week, a man undressed in a women’s locker room, citing a new state rule that allows people to choose a bathroom based on gender identity.

Around 5:30 p.m. on Feb. 8, a man wearing board shorts entered the women’s locker room at Evans Pool and took of his shirt, according to Seattle Parks and Recreation.

Women alerted staff, who told the man to leave, but he said “the law has changed and I have a right to be here.”

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$20 Million Announced For Transgender Causes

This is amazing! I’m happy to see that it’s not just going to stay in the US. There’s a need worldwide.

Two foundations pledged Tuesday to contribute $20 million over five years to organizations in the transgender movement, officials told BuzzFeed News, an unparalleled philanthropic donation to improve quality of life for transgender people around the world.

The dispersement could be a transformational windfall for groups with causes recently enjoying increased visibility — and growing backlash — but have historically had meager financial resources.

Beginning in 2016, the money will be awarded mostly to U.S. groups that focus on transgender issues or are led by transgender individuals, rather than organizations that include transgender issues as part of a broader agenda. The project will expand internationally in following years, particularly in poorer and developing nations.

Among the goals: quelling a rising tide of violence against transgender people, increasing job opportunities, and boosting long-term inclusion of transgender people in society.

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