Michelle Obama Snuck Out to Celebrate Gay Marriage

Just one more thing to add to their list of great achievements!!

On June 26, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court made same-sex marriage legal across the U.S., declaring that refusing to do so would violate the Constitution. Shortly after the high court’s landmark decision, the Obama administration celebrated by lighting the White House in rainbow colors.

Now, more than three years after that historic Obergefell v. Hodges ruling, former first lady Michelle Obama revealed that she and her daughter Malia, then 16, snuck out of the White House that night to join in on the fun happening outside their residence.

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Jim Obergefell Is First In Line

This waiting is agony for many of us, but few more so than Mr Obergefell. I hope we all win in this.

WASHINGTON — It was two years ago this week, when the Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act, that Jim Obergefell and John Arthur decided they were going to get married.

Now, Obergefell is at the Supreme Court — awaiting the outcome of his case, Obergefell v. Hodges, which is the lead case in the marriage cases that the justices heard arguments in earlier this year.

Obergefell and Arthur — who was suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) when they married — sued the state of Ohio to recognize their marriage on Arthur’s death certificate. In October 2013, Arthur did die — but Obergefell has kept going with the case, taking it all the way to the Supreme Court.

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No Matter What the Supreme Court Decides, the Fight for LGBT Equality Isn’t Over

In a day and age when racial equality is still a hot button issue, I don’t think any of us truly believe that we can just sit back and relax and say, “Well done!” if the Supreme Court Rules in our favor. As long as the Ultra Conservative Right has the loudest voice in this country, we will never be done.

Tremendous strides have been made over the last decade when it comes to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights. Same-sex couples can now marry in 37 states; a landmark federal case in California ordered the state to pay for a transgender inmate’s gender reassignment surgery; and President Obama issued an executive order barring companies that contract with the federal government from discriminating against LGBT workers.

So, Why Should You Care? Before the week is over, the Supreme Court will issue its decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, the lawsuit that will determine whether same-sex couples have a fundamental federal right to marriage. As we await what many predict will be a win for same-sex marriage advocates, it’s worth considering the work that remains ahead in achieving equality for LGBT Americans. While a positive ruling for same-sex marriage would be a huge step forward, it’s important to look past the altar at the other ways LGBT people still endure disparate treatment

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