Not Always Right

I just saw a notice from WordPress that I’ve had this blog for four years now. Hard to believe! In honor of this anniversary, I present you with a scenario from the website ‘Not Always Right‘ which, while not humorous, will have you fist-pumping by the end. As a reminder, if you’re unfamiliar with the site, you can click on the link and enjoy stories from customer service employees around the world dealing with stupid – and sometimes hateful – people in their daily work.

This scenario takes place at a fast food restaurant in Massachusetts.

(It’s a slow day at the cash register when an elderly man and his grandson walk up to the counter. The grandfather gives their order, but then notices the rainbow bracelet on my wrist as I go to take their payment.)

Grandpa: “Are you gay, son?”

(He points derisively at the bracelet.)

Me: “Yes, I am, but I’m not ashamed and—”

Grandpa: “Good God, they let you people touch food?”

Me: “Sir—”

Grandpa: “Don’t you ‘sir’ me, you f****** [homosexual slur]!”

Me: “That was uncalled for.”

Grandpa: “What’s uncalled for is you trying to turn my grandson gay.”

Me: “I assure you, sir, that’s not—”

Grandpa: “Back in my day we had values. Now there’s a [slur] as our president and [slur]s touching our food. This is why America is going down the s***er, because [slur]s like you think it’s cool to be a f****** [slur].”

Me: *biting my tongue* “Would you like to speak with my manager?”

Grandpa: “Yeah, I would! And I’ll ask him what sort of idiot he is for hiring a [slur] like you”

(My manager is a woman. She comes over.)

Manager: “What’s the problem here?”

Grandpa: “Your employee’s a [slur].”

Manager: *matter-of-factly* “Yes, he is.”

Grandpa: “This is a family restaurant. You can’t have [slur]s working here!”

Manager: “I can, and I do. But you’re right, sir, this is a family restaurant. As a result, I’m going to have to ask you to leave.”

(Grandpa stands there stunned, and the whole time the poor kid looks like he’s about to cry.)

Manager: “Your grandson is still welcome as he’s not the problem, but you aren’t allowed back in here. Have a good day.”

(Baffled and so angry he couldn’t speak, the grandpa dragged the boy out by his arm.)

Smith College Students Continue Fight Over “Discriminatory” Policy On Transgender Applicants

Dozens of students plan to protest at Smith College on Thursday due to what they say is the women’s school’s refusal to make its admissions process more inclusive for transgender women after students’ negotiations with administrators failed.

The Northampton, Mass., school came under fire last spring for its admissions policy after Calliope Wong, a transgender woman, was rejected because a federal student aid form identified her as male, even though she identifies as female. Since then, activists from the Smith Q&A student organization have pressed administrators to make a key change to the policy, but they said their demands have not yet been met; they will demonstrate as a result.

“We no longer have a working relationship with admissions [officials], and they refuse to negotiate further, so we need to show them that a lot of people care about this and that we aren’t going away,” said Sarah Fraas, a member of Q&A who is organizing the demonstration. “I think if Smith sees that their image as a feminist institution and a welcoming place will be compromised by not changing the policy, that is something they will respond to.”

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For The Clowns Hating The Coke Ad With A Gay Family…

BAM! I think I love this song a little more than I did about 10 minutes ago…

WASHINGTON — Conservative news outlet Breitbart.com reported Sunday night that a Coca-Cola ad featuring the song “America the Beautiful” sparked “outrage from some viewers” because, among other perceived offenses, it “featured a gay family.”

The writer of the song herself might be a bit confused by the outrage.

Katharine Lee Bates, who first drafted the words to the anthem in 1893, lived in Wellesley, Mass., for 25 years with Katharine Coman, whom some described as her lesbian partner. In an 1891 letter to Coman, Bates wrote that she couldn’t leave Wellesley for long because “so many love-anchors held me there, and it seemed least of all possible when I had just found the long-desired way to your dearest heart … Of course I want to come to you, very much as I want to come to Heaven.”

After Coman’s death, Bates published a collection of poems, Yellow Clover: A Book of Remembrance, that were to or about her. While the nature of their relationship isn’t certain — it’s been described as a “Boston marriage,” a term that included platonic relationships between women but often had undertones of romantic attachment — the two expressed deep love for each other during their many years together.

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How One Lawyer Turned The Idea Of Marriage Equality Into Reality

This is amazing.

PORTLAND, Maine — Ten years after the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ordered that the state become the first in the country to allow same-sex couples to marry, the once-feared concept has gained mainstream popular support, is recognized by the federal government, and is now the reality in 15 states and Washington, D.C.

Without Mary Bonauto, however, marriage equality might never have happened.

The lawyer brought marriage equality cases in Vermont, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. She argued the case to the justices in Massachusetts who brought marriage equality to the United States. She won the first decision striking down the Defense of Marriage Act’s federal definition of marriage, and the first appellate decision too — a ruling that forced the issue before the U.S. Supreme Court earlier this year. If there’s been a big moment in marriage equality’s long march to reality, Bonauto was probably there.
And it’s no secret either: The movement’s other leading lawyers openly credit Bonauto for making the success possible.

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Same-Sex Married Couples To Get Federal Tax Recognition Regardless of State

Another score! Of course we all know that the IRS and federal government always want as much money as possible from all of us – gay OR straight.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of the Treasury announced Thursday that when it comes to taxes, it will recognize same-sex couples’ marriages even if they live in a state that does not.

The decision, which was prompted by the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling to overturn the Defense of Marriage Act, marks the latest political progress for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Prior to this spring, the Internal Revenue Service did not recognize same-sex married couples pursuant to section 3 of DOMA. Once DOMA was overturned in June, the question became: What about same-sex married couples who moved to a state that didn’t recognize their marriage (a couple married in Massachusetts who moved to Arkansas, for example)?

Thursday’s ruling by Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew provides a uniform policy for the IRS; the state of celebration — where the wedding took place — now trumps the state of residency when it comes to federal tax status for same-sex married couples.

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