Hospitals are Making Strides for More Inclusive LGBT Healthcare

The government certainly doesn’t care about the LGBT community, so it’s nice to see some hospitals taking the initiative themselves. I told my old GP that I’m a lesbian and she was totally cool with it. Switched to a different GP, but haven’t told her yet. I remember visiting a Walgreens clinic a few years ago and when the doctor asked me if I needed the pill, I laughed and assured her that would never be necessary. She asked how I was so sure and, not knowing how else to say it (it was my first time revealing my sexuality to a physician), I said, “I’m the ‘L’ in LGBT.” She had no idea what I meant, soooo I had to spell it out.

Health care facilities across the U.S. are making “tremendous strides” toward LGBTQ-inclusive care, according to a new report by national LGBTQ advocacy group Human Rights Campaign.

The organization’s annual Healthcare Equality Index (HEI), now in its 11th year, found “remarkable progress” in areas including transgender-specific policies for patients, transgender-inclusive benefits for employees and LGBTQ-patient-care training for staff.

“This year has ushered in a new high watermark in LGBTQ inclusion in health care,” HRC President Chad Griffin said in a statement.

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New Regime Leadership: Jeff Sessions

I think I’m going to start a new series which I hope you all will contribute to as we fall into lives under a new regime. I admit I don’t go searching for news. I mainly post what I come across on Facebook or the handful of news sites I look at. So if you know of others that might fall under this New Regime Leadership series, please please share.

The man President-elect Donald Trump has nominated as his attorney general pick is a vocal opponent on issues like same-sex marriage and federal hate-crimes legislation, raising concerns among the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community,

“It is deeply disturbing that Jeff Sessions, who has such clear animus against so many Americans — including the LGBTQ community, women and people of color — could be charged with running the very system of justice designed to protect them,” Chad Griffin, president of the Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest LGBTQ civil rights organization, said in a statement.

“When Donald Trump was elected, he promised to be president for all Americans, and it is hugely concerning and telling that he would choose a man so consistently opposed to equality as one of his first — and most important — cabinet appointees,” Griffin added.

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This Kryptonite Argument Against Trans Rights Is Beating America’s Top LGBT Group

I would DEARLY love to have any woman – or man for that matter – demand that I prove I am a woman. I DARE them to, because when they do, I will sue them so fast their head will spin like Linda Blair’s in The Exorcist. I’m sick of this bullshit argument and the IGNORANCE that is flowing from it. It makes me want to throw up on every single ignorant CONservative in this country.

In late October, Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin explained why his group was spending an unprecedented $600,000 to uphold an ordinance in Houston that banned discrimination. It was critical, he said, for the largest LGBT organization in the country to represent the interests of its 1.5 million members and supporters.

“These are grassroots folks who give to us so that we can fight these battles, wherever they are,” Griffin told BuzzFeed News at the campaign headquarters, where he’d just flown in from Washington, D.C.

After marriage equality was won at the Supreme Court, HRC placed a priority on passing a nondiscrimination law in Congress. To build momentum, they endeavored to pass nondiscrimination legislation in cities and states along the way. Griffin said that when “building momentum across the country, every victory you have is a building block.” So defending Houston’s law was essential.

“This is a big one, it’s an important one, it’s an expensive one,” he said. “But it’s a battle we have got to win.”

Six days later, however, voters repealed the law by a 22-percentage point chasm — despite the fact that Griffin and his allies were six and nine points ahead in two early polls. Houston Unites, the name of the central campaign, had raised about $4 million in total, outspending their opponents three to one.

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A Fight For Credit In The Marriage Equality Movement

WASHINGTON — Few moments in the marriage equality movement have provoked more controversy than the 2009 decision of Chad Griffin to fight California’s Proposition 8 in federal court — and to enlist Ted Olson, a key official of the George W. Bush administration, to do so.

Now that the legal bill behind that legal effort has been revealed to be more than $6 million, some are asking questions about the steep fee for the lawyers in the Prop 8 case — especially as a slate of new marriage cases advance through the courts and lawyers jockey for position to argue the one that they expect will ultimately deliver marriage equality to all 50 states.

The debate over the Prop 8 price tag is just one part of a much larger battle within the legal world of LGBT rights: the fight for credit.

Since Griffin, now the head of the Human Rights Campaign, made the decision to go up against Prop 8 five years ago, the landscape for marriage equality has changed dramatically. Griffin, the campaign he put together — the American Foundation for Equal Rights (AFER) — and the lawyers he recruited — Olson and David Boies — are in the midst of a public relations campaign to claim a big slice of the credit for that change. While the fight for credit continues, especially with the forthcoming publication of Jo Becker’s book looking at the past five years of the marriage fight, the questions about the costs of the case have percolated under the surface.

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