Dozens of Big Businesses Back Gavin Grimm

First, please allow me to apologize for not posting more as of late. I know a lot is going on with the new regime in position, but at times it is overwhelming to me and I tend to want to just shut down mentally.

Second, this story has brought to life a legal term I’ve heard before, but don’t know much about: amicus brief. This is the definition of an amicus brief, for anyone unfamiliar with the term as I was:

An amicus brief is a document that is filed in a court by someone who is not directly related to the case under consideration. The most classic example is a document filed by an advocacy group, such as the American Civil Liberties Union. The additional information found in such a document can be useful for the judge evaluating the case, and it becomes part of the official case record. Many nations allow people or entities to file such documents with their courts.

The tradition of accepting amicus briefs comes from a larger concept, the amicus curiae, or “friend of the court.” A friend of the court may be interested in a case for various reasons, although he or she is not directly involved. For example, a court might be preparing to try a case related to online file sharing, an issue of great concern to many people. A brief might be filed to discuss the larger ramifications of potential case outcomes, since these ramifications might not be brought up by the prosecution or defense during the course of a trial.

I think it’s remarkable that 53 major companies have put their name to a single brief involving one young man’s struggle, but with huge impact on all who struggle as he does.

Dozens of companies have signed up to back a transgender teenager who is taking his case to use the bathroom matching his gender identity to the Supreme Court.

A coalition of 53 companies on Thursday wrote an amicus brief to the Supreme Court supporting the Virginia student.

I think, however, that this brief will be directed toward the lower courts as I heard yesterday that the Supreme Court declined to hear argument so the case reverts to the lower courts.

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